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Research Paper

Iron Oxide Magnetic Nanotubes and Their Drug Loading and Release Capabilities

[+] Author and Article Information
Linfeng Chen, Jining Xie, Kiran R. Aatre

Nanomaterials and Nanotubes Research Laboratory, College of Engineering, University of Arkansas, 700 Research Center Boulevard, Fayetteville, AR 72701

Vijay K. Varadan1

Nanomaterials and Nanotubes Research Laboratory, College of Engineering, University of Arkansas, 700 Research Center Boulevard, Fayetteville, AR 72701vjvesm@uark.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Nanotechnol. Eng. Med 1(1), 011009 (Nov 04, 2009) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000435 History: Received September 30, 2009; Revised October 08, 2009; Published November 04, 2009; Online November 04, 2009

Iron oxide magnetic nanomaterials are among the most widely used nanomaterials in nanomedicine. Due to their magnetic and structural properties, iron oxide magnetic nanotubes are extremely attractive for biomedical applications. This paper presents the synthesis of iron oxide magnetic nanotubes, and their potential applications in drug delivery. Three types of iron oxide magnetic nanotubes, i.e., hematite, maghemite, and magnetite, were synthesized using template and hydrothermal methods, and the effects of synthesis methods on the morphological and crystalline properties of the synthesized magnetic nanotubes were analyzed. The magnetization properties of the three types of synthesized magnetic nanotubes and their responses to external magnetic fields were studied. To explore their applications in drug delivery, the drug loading and release capabilities of the synthesized magnetic nanotubes were investigated. The final part of this paper discusses several important issues related to the applications of iron oxide magnetic nanotubes for drug delivery, especially the controlled release of drugs.

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Figure 1

SEM micrographs of synthesized magnetic nanotubes: (a) hematite, (b) maghemite, and (c) magnetite nanotubes; scale bar: 1 μm

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Figure 2

TEM images of magnetic nanotubes: (a) hematite, (b) maghemite, and (c) magnetite nanotubes

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Figure 3

XRD patterns of (a) hematite, (b) maghemite, and (c) magnetite nanotubes

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Figure 4

Normalized hysteresis loops of (a) hematite, (b) maghemite, and (c) magnetite nanotubes. The insets are enlargements of the loops near the origin.

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Figure 5

Alignment of magnetic nanotubes by magnetic fields: (a) and (b) maghemite nanotubes oriented along a static magnetic field (53.8 G); (c) and (d) magnetite nanotubes aligned along a static magnetic field (9.7 G)

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Figure 6

UV/vis spectrometer measurements: (a) UV/vis curves of ISS aqueous solutions with different concentrations; (b) UV/vis curves of ISS PBS solutions with different concentrations. The insets show the calibration curves for ISS solutions.

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Figure 7

ISS loading and release tests of maghemite nanotubes: (a) the loading curve (the inset shows the UV/vis spectra of the ISS aqueous solution containing maghemite nanotubes at intervals); (b) the release curve (the inset shows the UV/vis spectra of the PBS solution containing ISS loaded maghemite nanotubes at intervals)

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