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Research Papers

Thermal Properties of PVP Cryoprotectants With Nanoparticles

[+] Author and Article Information
Baotong Hao

Institute of Biothermal Science, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093, Chinahbt1224@163.com

Baolin Liu

Institute of Biothermal Science, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093, Chinablliuk@163.com

J. Nanotechnol. Eng. Med 2(2), 021015 (May 19, 2011) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002912 History: Received August 30, 2010; Revised October 03, 2010; Published May 19, 2011; Online May 19, 2011

Vitrification is an effective way for the cryopreservation of cells and tissues. The critical cooling rates for vitrification solution are relatively high. It is reported that nanoparticles can improve the heat transfer properties of solutions. To increase the heat transfer coefficient of aqueous cryoprotectant solutions, Hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles were added into Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solutions (50%, 55%, and 60%, w/w). The glass-transition temperature, devitrification temperature, and specific heat of PVP aqueous solutions with/without HA nanoparticles (0.1%, 0.5%, and 1%, w/w) were measured by a differential scanning calorimeter at a cooling rate of 20°C/min and a warming rate of 10°C/min. The change in density of the above solutions with temperature was determined by using a straw that can reveal the volume change of solutions. The thermal conductivity was calculated based on the experimental data. A device that can be used to measure the thermal conductivity of vitrification solutions with/without nanoparticles was developed in this study. The results showed that the glass-transition temperature, devitrification temperature, and specific heat of PVP aqueous solutions with HA nanoparticles are larger than those without HA nanoparticles. The thermal conductivity of solutions with HA nanoparticles is larger than those without HA nanoparticles at a specific temperature. The lower the temperature, the smaller the difference in thermal conductivity between the solutions with and without HA nanoparticles. The calculated thermal conductivity meets the measured data well.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

The nanofluids’ dispersion stability with time (a) 0 h, (b) 2 h, (c) 4 h, (d) 6 h, (e) 8 h, (f) 10 h, and (g) 12 h

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Figure 2

The DSC thermal curves of PVP with nanoparticles of different concentrations

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Figure 3

The effect of nanoparticles on the specific heat of 60% PVP

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Figure 4

Comparison of the thermal conductivity with model data for nanoparticles in 60% PVP at different temperature

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Figure 5

The dependence of volume of 60% PVP with nanoparticles at different mass fraction

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