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Research Papers

Biomechanical Strain Analysis at the Interface of Brain and Nanowire Electrodes on a Neural Probe

[+] Author and Article Information
Rui Zhu

Department of Applied Science, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204-1099; Department of System Engineering,  University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204-1099

G. L. Huang1

Department of Applied Science, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204-1099; Department of System Engineering,  University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204-1099glhuang@ualr.edu

Hargsoon Yoon1

Department of Engineering,  Norfolk State University, 700 Park Avenue, Norfolk, VA 23504hyoon@nsu.edu

Courtney S. Smith

Department of Engineering,  Norfolk State University, 700 Park Avenue, Norfolk, VA 23504

Vijay K. Varadan

Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Arkansas, 700 Research Center Boulevard, Fayetteville, AR 72701; Department of Neurosurgery,  College of Medicine, Pennsylvania State Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033

1

Corresponding authors.

J. Nanotechnol. Eng. Med 2(3), 031001 (Jan 09, 2012) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005484 History: Received May 06, 2011; Revised June 30, 2011; Published January 09, 2012; Online January 09, 2012

The viability of neural probes with microelectrodes for neural recording and stimulation in the brain is important for the development of neuroprosthetic devices. Vertically aligned nanowire microelectrode arrays can significantly enhance the capabilities of neuroprosthetic devices. However, when they are implanted into the brain, micromotion and mechanical stress around the neural probe may cause tissue damage and reactive immune response, which may degrade recording signals from neurons. In this research, a finite-element model of the nanowire microelectrode and brain tissue was developed. A rigid body method was provided, and the simulation efficiency was significantly increased. The interface between the microelectrode and brain tissue was modeled by contact elements. Brain micromotion was mimicked by applying a displacement load to the electrode and fixing the boundaries of the brain region. It was observed that the vertically aligned nanostructures on the electrode of the neural probe do increase the cellular sheath area. The strain field distributions under various physical coupling cases at the interface were analyzed along with different loading effects on the neural electrode.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic diagram of brain micromotion around a neural probe

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Figure 2

Von Mises strain fields of the brain tissue for Michigan electrode under longitudinal loading: (a) using rigid body method; (b) results of Lee, H. etc. [13], applying elastic properties for both electrode and brain tissue

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Figure 3

Meshed half symmetry model of microelectrode with nanowire areas implanted in the brain tissue

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Figure 4

The comparison of the Von Mises strain fields under longitudinal loading: (a) globe strain field for microeletrode with nanowire; (b) global strain field for Michigan eletrode; (c) local strain field for microeletrode with nanowire; and (d) local strain field for Michigan eletrode

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Figure 5

Globe strain fields of nanowire microelectrode with varied friction coefficients: (a) friction coefficient = 0; (b) friction coefficient = 0.5; (c) friction coefficient = 1; and (d) friction coefficient = 5

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Figure 6

The comparison of the Von Mises strain fields under transverse loading: (a) global strain field for microeletrode with nanowire; (b) global strain field for Michigan eletrode; (c) local strain field for microeletrode with nanowire; and (d) local strain field for Michigan eletrode

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