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Research Papers

Dry Electrode Based Wearable Wireless Brain–Computer Interface System

[+] Author and Article Information
Guo Kai

State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics,  Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083, China

Pei WeiHua1

State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics,  Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083, China

Wang Yu

State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083, China; School of Physical Science and Technology,  LanZhou University, LanZhou 730000, China

Xu Bing

 Beijing ShiYou Technology Co. Ltd., Beijing 100089, China

Gui Qiang, Liu Jian, Chen HongDa

State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics,  Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083, China

1

Corresponding author.

J. Nanotechnol. Eng. Med 2(3), 031007 (Jan 10, 2012) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005487 History: Received May 12, 2011; Revised November 29, 2011; Published January 10, 2012; Online January 10, 2012

Brain–computer interface (BCI) technology is a key issue in neural engineering, which can manipulate machine by electroencephalography (EEG). An important question surrounding the use of the BCI is the design of a wearable electroencephalography recording and processing equipment. We report the design and fabrication of a novel system based on dry electrodes, in which skin preparation and application of electrolytic gel are not required. In this study, an EEG-based BCI system, which includes a wireless transmitter module and an receiver module was designed, EEG is acquired using dry electrodes, amplified and processed by an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), and transmitted to the receiver by RF chip. The BCI system can obtain the subject’s degree of concentration, and those trained subjects have the ability of controlling the machine by changing their EEG signals. A experiment that controlling a toy car using the BCI system is successfully performed. The wearable transmitter module weighs 39 g only and easy to wear. The transmitter consumes 60 mW of dc power and generates an output power of 0 dBm. The BCI system is suitable for long-term EEG monitoring in users’ daily life. This system is feasible for further extension.

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Figures

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Figure 1

Fabrication process flow for a chemical delivery probe

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Figure 2

SEM image of dry electrode

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Figure 3

The comparison of impedance between the your dry electrodes and commercial electrodes

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Figure 4

(a) The package of EEG electrode; (b) the package of ground electrode; and (c) the transmitter module worn on the head

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Figure 5

Basic schematic of the BCI system

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Figure 6

The transmitter module (a) and the receiver module (b)

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Figure 7

The real-time attention and meditation values

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