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Research Papers

Influence of Dispersion and Alignment of Nanotubes on the Strength and Elasticity of Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Composites

[+] Author and Article Information
Unnati A. Joshi1

Vibration and Noise Control Laboratory,Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department,  Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand, Roorkee-247667, Indiaunnatiajoshi@gmail.com

Satish C. Sharma

Vibration and Noise Control Laboratory,Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department,  Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand, Roorkee-247667, Indiasshmefme@iitr.ernet.in

S. P. Harsha

Vibration and Noise Control Laboratory,Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department,  Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand, Roorkee-247667, Indiasurajfme@iitr.ernet.in

1

Corresponding author.

J. Nanotechnol. Eng. Med 2(4), 041007 (Apr 04, 2012) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005664 History: Received June 05, 2011; Revised June 14, 2011; Published March 30, 2012; Online April 04, 2012

In this paper, the effective strength and elastic properties of carbon nanotube reinforced composites are evaluated using a representative volume element with a number of carbon nanotubes embedded in the matrix. This concept is used to predict the mechanical properties of multiple, unidirectional, aligned, and also randomly dispersed carbon nanotube reinforced composites. To characterize these nanocomposites, a continuum model has been developed for large-scale analysis. The effective Young’s and shear moduli of the composites are determined using finite element analysis under the effect of elastic deformation. The role of design parameters like length and volume fraction of carbon nanotubes, tensile and shear strength as well as type of loading conditions are analyzed for multiple carbon nanotubes based composites. The discontinuous and continuous types of carbon nanotubes, with aligned and random distribution, are evaluated. The results show that the continuous and aligned carbon nanotubes produce the largest tensile modulus, compared to the discontinuous and aligned as well as discontinuous and randomly oriented carbon nanotubes along the longitudinal direction.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Hexagonal RVE with long CNT under the effect of an axial stretch ΔL

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Figure 2

Hexagonal RVE with short CNT under the effect of an axial stretch ΔL

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Figure 3

Sketch of continuous CNTs through the length of a hexagonal RVE

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Figure 4

Sketch of discontinuous and aligned CNTs inside the hexagonal RVE

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Figure 5

Sketch of discontinuous and randomly dispersed CNTs inside the hexagonal RVE

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Figure 6

The trend of effective Young’s modulus of elasticity (Ez ) for long CNTs reinforced composites against CNTs volume fraction Em  = 5 GPa

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Figure 7

The trend of composite strength versus number of CNTs

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Figure 8

Graph showing relative modulus of elasticity trend against volume fraction

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Figure 9

Magnitudes of stresses for 15 aligned and continuous CNTs based composite

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Figure 10

Von Mises stresses for long CNTs and hexagonal RVE

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Figure 11

Stress distribution for 47 continuous and aligned CNTs based composite

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Figure 12

Graph indicating tensile strength of discontinuous and aligned CNTs based composite

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Figure 13

Cut view showing stress pattern for 182 discontinuous and aligned CNTs

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Figure 14

Graph showing the effect of elasticity modulus for short CNTs having length of 50 nm

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Figure 15

Validation of proposed FEM model with ROM results short CNTs with length of 25 nm

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Figure 16

A comparative study of longitudinal elasticity modulus for three CNT length values

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Figure 17

Stress distribution pattern for the 182 aligned and short CNTs based composite

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Figure 18

The comparison trends for the elasticity modulus between the random and aligned CNTs

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Figure 19

Cut view of von Mises stress pattern of 51 short and randomly oriented CNTs

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Figure 20

Graph showing the validation of the proposed FEM model of discontinuous and randomly dispersed CNTs with Halpin–Tsai model

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Figure 21

Trend showing shear strength of composites along transverse plane

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Figure 22

Graph showing the validation of the proposed FEM model of short aligned and regularly spaced CNTs with MD results

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