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Research Paper

Novel Bifurcation Design for Centrifugal Microfluidic Platform With Wide Range Rotational Speed

[+] Author and Article Information
Samuel I-En Lin

Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Formosa University, Yunlin, 63208, Taiwan, R.O.C.samlin7@ms41.hinet.net

J. Nanotechnol. Eng. Med 2(1), 011001 (Dec 13, 2010) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002748 History: Received September 11, 2010; Revised September 19, 2010; Published December 13, 2010

A compact disk-based enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (CD-ELISA) is used in a wide range of applications including cancer and human immunodeficiency virus testing, drug screening, and micro-organism identification. Bifurcation design is the most important structure for microfluidic channels in CD-ELISA. In this study, a bifurcation design feasible for mass production and suitable for applications over a wide range of rotational speeds is proposed. Simulations based on two-phase flow theories along with incompressible flow theories were used in this study to confirm the feasibility of the novel design. The factors that influenced the bifurcation ratio for microfluidic channels in CD-ELISA were also investigated. The geometric length for bifurcation, opening angles, and the bifurcation shape in the middle section were varied to investigate the effects of each factor on the bifurcation ratio. From the experimental results, the factors with the greatest influence on the bifurcation ratio were the geometry of the end face of the partitioning plate and the distance from the opening end. These factors can be used as controlling factors for the design of microfluidic channels.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

The proposed bifurcation structure used in this study. It also outlines the design parameters used on the splitter design.

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Figure 2

(a) Bifurcation ratio of perturbing W2 parameter in the structure geometry. L=1.0 mm in this case. (b) Streamline representation of W2=0.7 mm, 1500 rpm. (c) Streamline representation of W2=0.72 mm, 1500 rpm. (d) Streamline representation of W2=0.76 mm, 1500 rpm.

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Figure 3

(a) Bifurcation ratios of perturbing L parameter in the structure geometry. W2=750 m in this case. (b) Fine intervals around L=3.2–3.6 mm region.

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Figure 4

(a) Spitting ratios from different combinations of L and W2. (b) L=2.0 mm, W2=0.75 mm. (c) L=2.5 mm, W2=0.75 mm. (d) L=3.0 mm, W2=0.75 mm.

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Figure 5

(a) Effects of distance to the bifurcation point, S, on the bifurcation ratio when L=2.5 mm, W2=0.75 mm; (b) S=1.2 mm; (c) S=1.325 mm; and (d) S=1.4 mm

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Figure 6

The relationship between different bifurcation ratios and parameter S resultant from different end face shapes of partitioning plate

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Figure 7

Right angle shape: (a) streamline results from right angle partitioning plate and (b) flow velocity across the microchannel

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Figure 8

Chamfer shape: (a) streamline results from right angle partitioning plate and (b) flow velocity across the microchannel

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Figure 9

Sharp angle: (a) streamline results from right angle partitioning plate and (b) flow velocity across the microchannel

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Figure 10

Bifurcation ratios of right angle partitioning plate simulated by two-phase flow and Navier–Stokes incompressible flow theories. The experimental results from different S values are also shown in the same plot (1500 rpm).

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Figure 11

(a) Spitting ratios of chamfer partitioning plate simulated by two-phase flow and Navier–Stokes incompressible flow theories. (b) Streamline results simulated by two-phase flow. (c) Streamline results simulated by Navier–Stokes incompressible flow theories.

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Figure 12

(a) Spitting ratios of sharp-angle partitioning plate simulated by two-phase flow and Navier-Stoke incompressible flow theories. (b) Streamline results simulated by two-phase flow. (c) Streamline results simulated by Navier–Stokes incompressible flow theories.

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Figure 13

Experimental/simulation results from our proposed splitter design, which has right-angle partitioning plate structure. It shows that near even bifurcation ratios cover wide operation range (1000–1500 rpm) under this proposed structure if a proper structure is selected.

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Figure 14

(a) Surface roughness measuring locations around the proposed bifurcation structure. (b) Measured results from each indicated point in (a).

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