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Research Paper

A Novel Experimental Device for Seebeck Coefficient Measurements of Bulk Materials, Thin Films, and Nanowire Composites

[+] Author and Article Information
D. Pinisetty

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803

N. Haldolaarachchige, D. P. Young

Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803

R. V. Devireddy1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803devireddy@me.lsu.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Nanotechnol. Eng. Med 2(1), 011006 (Feb 04, 2011) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003192 History: Received October 21, 2010; Revised December 03, 2010; Published February 04, 2011; Online February 04, 2011

An experimental setup has been designed and built for measuring the Seebeck coefficient of bulk thermoelectric materials, thin films, and nanowire composites in the temperature range 200–350 K. The setup utilizes a differential method for measuring the Seebeck coefficient of the sample. The sample holder is a simple clamp design, utilizing a spring-loaded mounting system to load and hold the sample between two copper blocks, on which the electrical leads, as well as thermocouples, are mounted. The spring-loaded design also offers fast turn-around times, as the samples can be quickly loaded and unloaded. To measure the Seebeck coefficient, a temperature difference is generated across the sample by using four 10kΩ resistive heaters mounted in series on one of the copper blocks. The resulting slope of the thermo-emf versus temperature difference plot is used to obtain the Seebeck coefficient at any temperature. Test measurements were carried out on bulk samples of nickel (Ni), bismuth-telluride (Bi2Te3), antimony-telluride (Sb2Te3), as well as thin films and nanowire composites of Ni.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

A photograph of the measurement setup mounted on a PPMS puck. The sample is mounted between two copper blocks, one of which acts as a heater and the other acts as a heat sink.

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Figure 2

SEM image of Ni nanowire arrays electrodeposited at ∼6 mA cm−2 using a PC template with an average pore diameter of ∼100 nm and an average length of 6 μm

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Figure 3

(a) Temperature dependence of Seebeck coefficient (μV/K) measured (using the experimental setup described in the article) on a Sb2Te3 bulk sample (filled circles) and Bi2Te3 bulk sample (filled squares). (b) Temperature dependence of Seebeck coefficient (μV/K) measured using the experimental setup described in the article, of Bi2Te3 bulk sample (dashed line) and Sb2Te3 bulk sample (solid line), is compared with the values in the published literature, i.e., Ref. 43 for bulk Bi2Te3 and Ref. 42 for bulk Sb2Te3 samples.

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Figure 4

(a) Temperature dependence of Seebeck coefficient (μV/K) measured (using the experimental setup described in the article) on a bulk Ni sample (filled circles), Ni thin film sample (filled squares), and a Ni nanowire array (filled triangles). (b) Temperature dependence of Seebeck coefficient (μV/K) measured using the experimental setup described in the article, of Ni bulk sample (solid line) and Ni nanowires with a diameter of 100 nm (dashed line), is compared with the values in the published literature, i.e., Ref. 22 for bulk Ni and Ref. 45 for Ni nanowires of 30 nm in diameter.

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