0
Research Paper

Nanorobot Propulsion Using Helical Elastic Filaments at Low Reynolds Numbers

[+] Author and Article Information
Deepak K., J. S. Rathore

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani-333031, India

N. N. Sharma1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani-333031, Indianitinipun@gmail.com

1

Corresponding author.

J. Nanotechnol. Eng. Med 2(1), 011009 (Feb 04, 2011) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003300 History: Received December 07, 2010; Revised December 17, 2010; Published February 04, 2011; Online February 04, 2011

Swimming in micro/nano domains is a challenge and involves a departure from standard methods of propulsion, which are effective at macrodomains. Flagella based propulsion is seen extensively in nature and has been proposed as a means of propelling nanorobots. Natural flagella actively consume energy in order to generate bending moments that sustain constant or increasing amplitude along their length. However, for man-made applications fabricating passive elastic filaments to function as flagella is more feasible. Of the two methods of flagellar propulsion, namely, planar wave and helical wave, the former has been studied from a passive filament point of view, whereas the latter is largely unexplored. In the present work an elastohydrodynamic model of the filament has been created and the same is used to obtain the steady state shape of an elastic filament driven in a Stokes flow regime. A modified resistive force theory, which is very effective in predicting propulsion parameters for a given shape, is used to study the propulsive dynamics of such a filament. The effect of boundary conditions of the filament on determining its final shape and propulsive characteristics are investigated. Optimization of physical parameters is carried out for each of the boundary conditions considered. The same are compared with the planar wave model.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Variation of swimming speed with dimensionless length for different driving frequencies

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Plot of efficiency with respect to L/l and θ at 100 Hz showing optimal band of both values

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Plot showing swimming velocity variation wit

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic of the nanorobot showing (a) initial nondeflected shape of the filament and (b) steady state deflected shape of the filament

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Steady state shapes of the filament projected on xy plane for different values of dimensionless length (L/l) for a rotation frequency of 100 Hz and θ=45 deg: (a) L/l=1 (solid), (b) L/l=2 (dashed), and (c) L/l=5 (dotted), L/l=10 (dot dashed)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Steady state shapes of the filament projected on xz plane for different values of dimensionless length (L/l) for a rotation frequency of 100 Hz and θ=45 deg: (a) L/l=1 (solid), (b) L/l=2 (dashed), and (c) L/l=5 (dotted), L/l=10 (dot dashed)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Steady state shapes of the filament projected on yz plane for different values of dimensionless length (L/l) for a rotation frequency of 100 Hz and θ=45 deg: (a) L/l=1 (solid), (b) L/l=2 (dashed), and (c) L/l=5 (dotted), L/l=10 (dot dashed)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In