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Research Paper

Magnetic Nanofilms for Biomedical Applications

[+] Author and Article Information
Edoardo Sinibaldi

Center for MicroBioRobotics IIT@SSSA, Italian Institute of Technology (IIT), Pontedera 56025, Italyedoardo.sinibaldi@iit.it

Virginia Pensabene

Center for MicroBioRobotics IIT@SSSA, Italian Institute of Technology (IIT), Pontedera 56025, Italyvirginia.pensabene@iit.it

Silvia Taccola

 Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa 56127, Italys.taccola@sssup.it

Stefano Palagi

Center for MicroBioRobotics IIT@SSSA, Italian Institute of Technology (IIT), Pontedera 56025, Italys.palagi@sssup.it

Arianna Menciassi

 Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa 56127, Italy; Center for MicroBioRobotics IIT@SSSA, Italian Institute of Technology (IIT), Pontedera 56025, Italyarianna.menciassi@sssup.it

Paolo Dario

 Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa 56127, Italy; Center for MicroBioRobotics IIT@SSSA, Italian Institute of Technology (IIT), Pontedera 56025, Italypaolo.dario@sssup.it

Virgilio Mattoli

Center for MicroBioRobotics IIT@SSSA, Italian Institute of Technology (IIT), Pontedera 56025, Italyvirgilio.mattoli@iit.it

J. Nanotechnol. Eng. Med 1(2), 021008 (May 14, 2010) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001616 History: Received March 31, 2010; Revised April 16, 2010; Published May 14, 2010; Online May 14, 2010

Polymeric ultrathin films, also called nanofilms or nanosheets, show peculiar properties making them potentially useful for several applications in biomedicine, e.g., as nanoplasters for localized drug release or as a new solution for closing endoluminal surgical wounds. In this sense, one of most challenging issues is film control in the working environment: the possibility of including magnetic components, such as magnetic nanoparticles or nanotubes, paves the way for the effective use of nanofilms in the human body, by allowing precise positioning by an external magnetic field. State of the art and new perspectives of magnetic nanofilms for biomedical applications are here presented, including fabrication, modeling, characterization and validation.

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Figures

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Figure 1

Magnetic free-standing nanofilm: preparation

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Figure 2

(a) Free-standing magnetic nanofilm (NPs 10 mg/ml) suspended in aqueous solution. (b) Optical microscope picture shows the dispersion of magnetic NPs aggregates.

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Figure 3

SEM images of homogeneous PLLA magnetic nanofilms with different NPs concentrations: (a) 0.1 mg/ml, (b) 1 mg/ml, and (c) 10 mg/ml

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Figure 4

Flexibility tests with magnetic nanofilms: a-b nanofilm aspiration and c-d nanofilm injection

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Figure 5

Experimental results: maximum dragging speed versus magnet height. The fitting power law is accurately predicted by Eqs. 4,5.

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Figure 6

(a) Free-standing nanofilm in water, manipulated by moving the permanent magnet until deposition on the tissue surface. (b) Nanofilm perfectly adhering on gastric mucosa.

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