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SPECIAL SECTION: SIMULATION AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES AND APPLICATIONS OF CARBON NANOTUBES AND GRAPHENES IN ENGINEERING AND MEDICINE: Guest Editorial

Gene Detection With Carbon Nanotubes

[+] Author and Article Information
Q. Wang

e-mail: q.wang@ad.umanitoba.ca

N. Wu

Department of Mechanical
and Manufacturing Engineering,
University of Manitoba,
Winnipeg, MB, R3T 5V6, Canada

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received April 26, 2012; final manuscript received July 11, 2012; published online September 24, 2012. Assoc. Editor: Henry Hess.

J. Nanotechnol. Eng. Med 3(2), 020902 (Sep 24, 2012) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007388 History: Received April 26, 2012; Revised July 11, 2012

The potential of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as nanosensors in detection of genes through a vibration analysis is investigated with molecular dynamics. The carbon nanotube based nanosensor under investigation is wrapped by a gene whose structure includes a single strand deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) with a certain number of distinct nucleobases. Different genes are differentiated or detected by identifying a differentiable sensitivity index that is defined to be the shifts of the resonant frequency of the nanotube. Simulation results indicate that the nanosensor is able to differentiate distinct genes, i.e., small proline-rich protein 2 A, small proline-rich protein 2B, small proline-rich protein 2D, and small proline-rich protein 2E, with a recognizable sensitivity. The research provides a rapid, effective, and practical method for detection of genes.

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References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

An ssDNA of the first ten bases of SPR-2 A (AAGAAAAAAT) gene wrapped on a (5, 5) CNT with a length of 15 nm: (a) initial configuration; and (b) helical-stacked conformation after 10 ns of the simulation

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Snapshots of a (5, 5) CNT with a length of 15 nm wrapped by a ten-base ssDNA (AAGAAAAAAT) of the first ten bases SPR-2A gene

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Vibration of a (5, 5) CNT with a length of 15 nm: (a) pristine nanotube; and (b) nanotube wrapped by a ten-base ssDNA (AAGAAAAAAT) of the first ten bases of SPR-2A gene

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Resonant frequency of a pristine (5, 5) CNT with a length of 15 nm versus resonant frequency of the CNT wrapped by a ten-base ssDNA (AAGAAAAAAT) of the first ten bases of SPR-2A gene

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